3D printing is so 2013. This woman makes desktop milling machines!

3D printing is so 2013. This woman makes desktop milling machines!

 

My interview with Other Machine Co. CEO Danielle Applestone, The (Female) Miller’s Tale, is up on The Economist’s Lookahead blog.

Ms. Applestone impressed me with her drive, her smarts, and her passion for making tools accessible to all of us would-be garage tinkerers. Not only is she a woman in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math), and in manufacturing, but she’s also a woman who launches and leads successful companies.

Nice.

I really enjoyed learning what her desktop milling machines can do. But the most compelling part of the interview for me was her personal story. As the daughter of a disabled veteran, she understood from an early age how good engineering and good design really can improve someone’s quality of life.

In other words, math, manufacturing and tech aren’t just about numbers; they’re about people.

Read more about the very cool Danielle Applestone, and about Other Machine Co., here.

The real final frontier — (not space)

The real final frontier — (not space)

 

What a thrilling conversation: Ralph Greenspan, who heads up the BRAIN Initiative, is a humble, brilliant neuroscientist who will be one of reason we someday shall hold in-depth knowledge of how the brain works.

In this interview, which is up on The Economist’s Lookahead blog, Dr. Greenspan explains where we are in our understanding of the human brain. He might also change how you view the humble fruit fly. That common summer kitchen annoyance might just help us unlock our own cognitive mysteries.

In an hour-long phone interview, we touched on a number of subjects beyond brain mapping, including consciousness (and whether robots should have it), how desirable and plausible it is extend human life bionically, and what he considers his real legacy. (It’s not the BRAIN Initiative, impressive as that project is.)

Find the interview here.

Why this country, not China, could be the one to watch

Why this country, not China, could be the one to watch

Did you know that Indonesia’s GDP per capita is actually higher than those of Italy or even Canada?

Some 250 million people live in Indonesia, half of them around a national poverty line of $22 per month. But Indonesians are starting to get a taste for the Western lifestyle and all its consumer class accoutrements, many of which require electricity. And that means the archipelago nation must solve some pressing energy issues.Indonesia’s new president, Joko Widodo, is young and compelling and often compared to Barack Obama. He has some formidable tasks ahead of him. In this interview with Destry Damayanti, the Chief Economist at Indonesia’s Bank Mandiri, we discuss some of those urgent issues. If you’re interested in emerging markets, this is one worth reading.

Find my interview with Destry Damayanti up at The Economist’s Lookahead blog, here.